Access Jamaica
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Kingston 4, St. Andrew, Jamaica
876-922-8600
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The Ministry of Finance & Public Service (MOFPS), has overall responsibility for developing the Government’s fiscal and economic policy framework; collecting and allocating public revenues and playing an important role in the socio-economic development of the country in creating a society in which each citizen has every prospect of a better quality of life. The priority goals of the Ministry are geared towards: Enabling growth and national development through a sound and predictable macroeconomic policy framework that maintains low inflation, stable exchange rates and competitive interest rates;  Improving revenue administration by creating a simple, equitable, and competitive tax environment to ensure greater compliance and enhance growth.

Ministry of Transport and Mining

The Hon. Robert Montaque MP

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Kingston 10, St. Andrew, Jamaica
876-754-1900
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The Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing was formed in January, 2012, taking on housing portfolio which was previously, a part of the Ministry of Water and Housing.   The Ministry’s primary responsibility continues to be the country’s land, marine and air transport as well as the main road network, including bridges, drains, gullies, embankments and other such infrastructure. Having taken on the Housing portfolio, the Ministry’s remit will also now include the facilitation, development and implementation of access to legal, adequate and affordable housing solutions for the Jamaican people.

Ministry of National Security

Dr. Honorable Horace Chan

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Kingston, St. Andrew, Jamaica
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Vision The Ministry of National Security will be the Model of National Security Excellence in the Caribbean Region, characterized by a highly trained and motivated staff, sophisticated and flexible policy development capacity, effective and efficient deployment of resources, the employment of modern technology and best practices in crime fighting, crime prevention and protecting the nation from external threats.

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Kingston, St. Andrew, Jamaica
876-968-7116
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The Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Agriculture (MICAF) is described as Jamaica’s “Business Ministry”. It’s mandate is to lead in the development of policies that will create growth and jobs, while achieving social inclusion and consumer protection.  The Ministry, working with its stakeholders, is primarily responsible for business policy development, monitoring and evaluation, while giving direction and oversight to a cluster of implementing departments and agencies. 

Attorney General

The Hon. Marlene Malahoo Forte, QC, MP

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Kingston 10, St. Andrew, Jamaica
876-906-4923
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The Ministry of Justice (MOJ) is a Government of Jamaica ministerial entity, headed by the Minister of Justice. It was formed at the end of October 2001 when it was separated from the then Ministry of National Security and Justice.

Over the years the Ministry of Justice has been paired and separated from the Ministry of National Security on more than one occasion.

The Ministry of Justice is the lead administrator of Justice in Jamaica and therefore administers legislation, delivers justice services, and provides policy support and analysis on justice issues.

Ministry of Labour and Social Security

The Hon. Shahine Robinson, MP

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Kingston, St. Andrew, Jamaica
876-922-9500
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The Labour Division of the Ministry commenced operations in 1938 as an Employment Bureau. The Bureau was the first official response to growing unemployment, which was spreading throughout Jamaica during that period.

The relationship between employer and employee at the time was one of master and servant. This gave rise to grave economic disparities within the population as most persons received low wages and had poor living and working conditions.